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Image from page 601 of "The Street railway journal" (1884)  Three-Phase Transformer
Image by Internet Archive Book Images Identifier: streetrailwayjo201902newy Title: The Street railway journal Year: 1884 (1880s) Authors: Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co. Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: feeder switches can alsohe operated by a hand control switch, as well as auto-matically by overload. Other features of the power-houseswitchboards are made plain by the wiring diagram. Therearc three 1500-kw three-phase General Electric generators ator panels, and will act to open the oil switch in the in-coming feeder in case the sub-station attempts to give cur-rent to the line instead of receiving it. This might happenat any of the sub-stations on a loop circuit in case of ashort circuit on the high-tension lines between the powerhouse and the sub-station. The sub-station would then re-ceive current from the other direction, and feed back intothe short circuit. In case U were desired as a regular thingto feed back from the sub-station because of some sectionof the high-tension lines being cut out, it would be doneby adjusting the reversal relay to allow this. After pass-ing the current transformers, the incoming line is takento the three-pole oil machine switch. The switch is con- Text Appearing After Image: LONG CUT ON THE AURORA, ELGIN & CHICAGO RAILWAY now installed. The 26,000-volt wiring in both power sta-tion and sub-stations is carried in brick hues or conduits,which isolates each circuit from adjacent circuits. Theregular sub-station equipment for all the sub-stations com-prises two 500-kw rctary converters with a bank of trans-formers for each. The sub-stations have basements whichare air-tight, and in which air is kept under pressure by theblower for cooling the transformer. Referring to the accompanying wiring diagram of a sub-station it is seen that one panel of the switchboard is de-voted to the incoming 26,000-volt line. Where there is oneor more suli-stations beyond this one there is another paneldevoted to the outgoing line to the next sub-station. Theprincipal object of this is to make it possible to cut off theline beyond in case of short circuit. After passing thelightning arresters the incoming line goes throug;h currenttransformers which supply current for an indi Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work. Koln, DB, Class 101  Three-Phase Transformer
Image by Nik Morris (van Leiden) The DB Class 101 is a class of three-phase electric locomotives built by Adtranz and operated by DB Fernverkehr in Germany. 145 locomotives were built between 1996 and 1999 to replace the 30-year old and aging Class 103 and 120, primiarily hauling Intercity services. In the early 1990s the current electric locomotives serving the heavy and fast DB (160 km/h+) Intercity services, the Class 103, were wearing out with inceasing numbers of failures and falling traffic availability. Their annual mileage getting on for 400,000 km and they had never been design for the fast, heavy trains. An aggravating factor was the Program DB 90, Fahren auf Verschleiß . This was an effort to cut costs, literally "Drive to Deterioration". In December 1989 a second, Europe-wide bidding process was initiated and some 30 designs wee offered to DB in the 5 to 6 KW range. ABB Henschel used two class 120s giving them new electric power converters based on GTO-Thyristors, as well as new on-board electronics. 120 004 additionally received flexi-float bogies adapted from ICE (at that time essential fixed carriage formations with a loco power car at each end) units with driving rods instead of pivot pins, disc brakes, and utilising a new biodegradable polyol-ester cooling agent for its main transformer. Both of these reconfigured locomotives covered large distances in regular IC service with availablity. In December 1994 DB signed a letter of intent with ABB Henschel for an order of 145 locomotives on 28 July 1995. The first class 101 locomotive was ceremonially presented on 1 July 1996. By this time.ABB Henschel had merged with AEG Schienenfahrzeugtechnik to become ADtranz. There are some interesting design feature to these locos: The body had to be both as aerodynamic as possible, and at the same time be as cost-effective as possible. For these reasons the designers passed on a front with multiple curved areas. The slope angle was governed by the need to reduce loco – coach distance when coupled to maintain aerodynamic performance. Large C-scetions are welding in to support the undercarriage euipemnt along with steel plate.The front of the driver's cabs are made from 4 mm thick steel plate. The front window panes can be utilised on either side of the locomotive, and are simply glued into the body without window frame. The roof of the driver's cab is part of the body, not the roof, to give more strength. The four doors on the sides lead directly into the driver's cabs and are made of light alloy. The side windows in the driver's cab in the class 101 featured pivoted windows, in order to avoid a window well, which can result in corrosion problems. All windows and doors are completely pressurised by means of a special sealant section. The body side panels are 3 mm thick, and are carried by columnar sections, in between which parts of the cabling channels are laid. The side panels encompass the area from the back end of the driver's cabs up to the beginning of the sloped roof section, which is part of the removable roof sections. The roof is made of aluminium in three separate sections. The fan grills and roof slope area belong to the roof sections, and can be removed as part of the roof, making the entire width of the body available for work on the machinery inside speeding maintenance and lower costs. The roof sections are resting on the side panels, their connecting belts, and the fixed roofs of the driver's cabs, and a floating seal is built into the sections. The roof sections are completely flat for aerodynamic reasons, with the exception of the pantographs, signal horns, and antenna for radio /data communication. Since everything on the roof is mounted just a little under the top edge of the roof of the driver's cab, almost nothing catches any wind—even a lowered pantograph is difficult to detect. The pantographs are mounted "the wrong way around" with the hinges are pointing inwards to smooth air flow Another special feature in class 101 units are the bogie side frame covers. They are mounted alongside the frame and cover the area down to the wheel bearings again smooth air flow over the body. The class 101 were only capable of maximum speeds of 220 kilometres per hour but the bogies were design for 250 to give room for future development. Image from page 283 of "The Street railway journal" (1884)  Three-Phase Transformer
Image by Internet Archive Book Images Identifier: streetrailwayjo251905newy Title: The Street railway journal Year: 1884 (1880s) Authors: Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co. Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: lene. It is the chief shippingpoint of the Coeur dAlene mines, with boats running to all As shown on the accompanying map, the railway follows thevalley of the Spokane River, which is the natural outlet of LakeCoeur dAlene. About midway between the termini, the roadcrosses the river, 2>7lA ft- above the surface of the water, on a600-ft. wooden truss bridge, and at the same time also crossesthe dividing line between the States of Idaho and Washington.The track is of standard gage and is laid with 60-lb. standardA. S. C. E. section T-rail in 30-ft. lengths. The roadbed con-sists of hewn fir ties 7 ins. x 7 ins. x 8 ft., laid 2-ft. centers,and thoroughly ballasted with rock gravel. This ballast wasnearly all taken from the right of way. The rails are con- 264 STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. [Vol. XXV. No. 6. nected with angle-iron bars, the joints being suspended, and arebonded throughout with Brown plastic bonds. Whenever neces-sary, the track is drained with tile laid 8 ins. under the ties. Text Appearing After Image: TANGENT TRACK 3% MILES LONG, SHOWING BALLAST ANDGENERAL APPEARANCE OF TRACK NEAR CARDERSSTATION, WASHINGTON There is a gradual up grade from Spokane to Coeur dAlene,averaging 0.15 per cent. The heaviest grade is 1.2 per cent,and the maximum curvature is 8 degs. Side-pole overhead construction is used with 35-ft. poles,spaced 100 ft. apart. The trolley wire is No. 0000, figure 8,and is suspended 22 ft. above the track. Power is purchasedfrom the Washington Water Power Company, being trans-mitted from that companys water-power plant in Spokane totwo rotary-converter sub-stations, located at Green Acres andRoss, 14 and 25 miles, respectively, from Spokane. The trans-mission voltage is 22,000 volts three-phase. The equipment ateach sub-station consists of one 200-kw rotary converter andthree 100-kw oil-insulated transformers, the rotaries feedingonto the line through No. 000 and No. 0000 feeders. The com-panys business has grown beyond the capacity of the sub-sta-tions, and there have bee Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Written by Adele Haddad